What You'll Learn
  • An end-run takes a proposal directly to the other side's stakeholders or higher authority, or other third parties to pressure a counterpart to adjust their position
  • End-runs put the relationship at serious risk
  • Do not use an end-run in collaborative negotiations
  • The defenses against an end-run are to have build a trusting relationship, have stakeholder buy-in on the process and strategy

Recognize End-runs

After being rejected, taking a proposal directly to the other side's stakeholders or higher authority, or other third parties to pressure a counterpart to adjust their position.

Doing an End-run is a popular and sometimes appropriate tactic in sales that is used to influence a desire for the product or service before there is any alignment of interests that warrant negotiation. When used in a negotiation, however, an End-run puts the relationship at serious risk.


Expect this tactic to be used as part of one of these Negotiation Strategies (competitive, collaborative, avoidance, accommodation, compromise) and in these stages of the Negotiation Process (Preparation, Exchange, Bargain, Conclude, Execution).

Negotiation Strategy: Competitive Negotiations
Negotiation Stages: Bargain and Conclude


Don't Use an End-run in Collaborative Negotiations

End-runs by their nature are confrontational and not collaborative. If you feel compelled or are required to do an End-run on the other side, consider advising your counterpart so as to maintain trust.

Defend Against End-runs

In the case of End-runs, prevention is critical as there is no real defense.

Gain the input and buy-in of your stakeholders early on in the negotiation cycle, and keep them informed of the progress of negotiations, so that any End-run by the other side will be rebuffed.